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We Regret Over Ex-Pilots Message on 737 Max Software – Boeing

Boeing stated Sunday that it understands difficulties raised by the release of a former Boeing test pilot’s internal messages noting…

By Luann Reagan , in Industry News News , at October 21, 2019 5:58 AM EDT Tags: , ,

Boeing stated Sunday that it understands difficulties raised by the release of a former Boeing test pilot’s internal messages noting erratic software program behavior two years before lethal crashes of its 737 MAX plane.

The world’s largest plane manufacturer, tipped into a new crisis over the safety of the banned 737 MAX after the messages came out on Friday, also mentioned it was investigating the “circumstances of this exchange” and regretted the complexities that the release of messages posed for the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

The FAA on Friday asked Boeing Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg to give an explanation for the delay in turning over the “concerning” record, which Boeing found months ago.

In the messages from November 2016, then-chief technical pilot Mark Forkner tells a colleague the MCAS anti-stall system – the same one associated with lethal crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia – was “running rampant” in a flight simulator session.

The messages prompted a new call in Congress for Boeing to shake up its management because it struggles to rebuild trust and lift an eight-month safety ban on its fastest-selling airplane.

Boeing Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg, who was stripped of his chairman title by the company’s panel nine days ago, is about to testify before the panel on Oct. 30.

DeFazio’s committee further obtained details of a 2016 Boeing survey that discovered almost 40% of 523 employees handling safety certification work perceived “potential undue stress” from managers, such as bullying or intimidation.

Other top concerns embody “schedule pressure” and “high workload,” although 90% of the employees stated they were comfortable raising concerns about “undue stress” to management, based on a copy of the Boeing presentation of the survey outcomes.