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US Navy’s Newest Littoral Battle Vessel Slides into Mobile Waters

The U.S. Navy’s latest Independence-variant littoral combat ship (LCS), the future USS Oakland (LCS 24) launched into the sea of…

By Luann Reagan , in Industry News News , at July 23, 2019 7:21 AM EDT Tags: , ,

The U.S. Navy’s latest Independence-variant littoral combat ship (LCS), the future USS Oakland (LCS 24) launched into the sea of Austal USA’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama.

“The future USS Oakland (LCS 24) is now in the sea. 4,000 employees and 800+ suppliers across the US (380 in Ala.) work to build these great ships, LCS & EPF. Congrats to the LCS workforce for reaching today’s milestone!” it says on its Twitter account.

The future USS Oakland is a fast, flexible, focused-mission platform planned for operation in near-shore environments yet able to open-ocean operation. It is created to defeat uneven “anti-access” threats akin to mines, quiet diesel submarines, and fast floor craft. The ship will probably be homeported in San Diego.

In a recent declaration, the U.S. Navy stated that the latest combat ship should be blessed during a 10 a.m. EDT ceremony Saturday, June 29, in Mobile, Alabama.

U.S. Executive Ken Calvert of California will do the ceremony’s principal address.  Kate Brandt, Google’s sustainability executive, will serve as the ship’s backer. In a time-honored Navy custom, Ms. Brandt will baptize the ship by smashing a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow.

“The christening of the future USS Oakland marks a necessary step toward this great ship’s entry into the line,” stated Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “The commitment and skilled work of our business companions ensure this vessel will represent the great metropolis of Oakland and serve our Navy and Marine Corps team for many years to come.”

The first Oakland (2847) was approved in 1918 and used for freight transportation. The second, CL 95, was approved in 1942 and during seven years of service was vital in many anti-aircraft ventures across the Asia-Pacific theater of services.